Summer

I’ve reached the point of summer where I feel entirely rested.  I’ve taught a few camps and have one more next week, but for the most part, summer has meant resting, reading, working some on the house, spending time with people I love, binge-watching television shows, reflecting about the last few years, and starting to think about how I want to do things differently in the year ahead.  The chaos and pain in the world lately is in sharp contrast to the relative peace in my life and home, and I feel both grateful for that and sad about it.

Last night, my husband and I went to see Ray LaMontagne in concert. We’ve been fans of Ray for a long time.  My husband prefers his old stuff, and is happiest when it’s just Ray and his guitar, but I kind of love the dreamy, psychedelic new stuff just as much.  But what might have struck me most was just that experience of watching someone clearly doing what they love to do.  Ray said something about not being intentional with the music, but instead letting it come and be what it wants to be.  This is how I experience writing–trying to get myself out of the way and let the words come, rather than wrenching the words into some vision I have.  I’m not sure exactly how to translate this to librarianship, except just the idea of being authentic and genuine with the kids, and also supporting them in being their genuine selves.  I miss the kids during the summer. Don’t get me wrong–I love having a break and especially love my summer sleep schedule–but I miss their energy and quirks and curiosity.

 

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Ray LaMontagne and My Morning Jacket

 

I like to try to learn something new every summer, and this summer, I’m working some on mindfulness and breathing.  Not quite as visibly rewarding as sewing or electronics projects, but I’m hoping it will help with my physical health!

So, not a very exciting post, but summer is about recharging, and I’m feeling good at the moment and hopeful about the year ahead.  It’s going to be a strange one, I think.  I suspect we will need to go into it at full power to make it through November.  (If you think middle schoolers don’t care or talk about politics, think again!)

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “Summer

  1. Perhaps, if you want to moderate political conversations, you could pull out some thinking routines like Circle of Viewpoints or Tug of War. Or sneakily have them reason with evidence. Or support their opinions with, “What makes you say that?”

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